Experienced female scuba diver dead after struggling at HMAS Adelaide site near Terrigal Oct 6, 2014

 
Ian Walker From: The Daily Telegraph  Oct 06, 2014 1:21PM

The 33-year-old from Bronte was 30 metres below the surface when her friend noticed she was struggling.
The pair were part of a deep diving group exploring the HMAS Adelaide wreck.
The friend dragged the woman to the surface with an emergency ascent when he saw her in distress.
As they reached the surface, the woman went into cardiac arrest. Members of the diving group then pulled the woman on board a vessel and performed CPR as she was brought to shore about 9am.

See more http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/experienced-female-scuba-diver-dead-after-struggling-at-hmas-adelaide-site-near-terrigal/story-fni0cx12-1227081066743?nk=23b205a365fe7dd6cc60a8439c9a1711

Woman suffers the bends diving at HMAS Adelaide at Terrigal April 21, 2014

A SYDNEY woman has suffered the bends while diving at the HMAS Adelaide at Terrigal.
The woman was flown to the hyperbaric unit at Sydney’s Prince of Wales hospital after a Careflight medical team collected her about 1 pm.
Read more http://www.theherald.com.au/story/2231017/woman-suffers-the-bends-diving-at-hmas-adelaide-at-terrigal/

Diver suffering ‘the bends’ Jan 4, 2013

Posted by: mstevens January 4, 2013 in Central Coast News

Emergency services were called to the Haven at Terrigal this afternoon to assist a diver who was suffering from ‘the bends’.
The 53-year-old man was flown to Prince of Wales Hospital after his condition deteriorated on the way to hospital.
The man was diving near the ex-HMAS Adelaide site when he took ill.

Comment in response to this article:
warning call
January 5, 2013 at 12:58 pm

There have been an excessive number of bends cases related to the Adelaide in the past few months being noted in the news and yet the spokesperson for the Central Coast Artificial Reef Program (CCARP) denies that this is a problem. If the medical profession are trying to alert the public to the fact that the HMAS Adelaide is a potentially dangerous dive to unexperienced divers, shouldn’t the caretakers of the site be more responsible in limiting dives to experienced divers – before a tragedy happens?

http://www.nbnnews.com.au/index.php/2013/01/04/diver-suffering-the-bends/

Diving sickness rises after naval ship sinks

Debris from the dumped warship HMAS Adelaide collected on Avoca Beach after the big swell over the weekend (Feb 23 & 24, 2013). This marine pollution was sanctioned by the Minister for Environment Tony Bourke, Barry O’Farrell, Chris Hartcher, Gosford Council and John Asquith from the Community Environment Network, University of Newcastle and the Marine Discovery Centre. Taxpayers paid $10 million to dump this rubbish next to this beautiful beach. 
Much more is washing up, this is just what one person collected on their morning walk on Saturday. When the same honeycomb aluminium started washing up on Avoca Beach six weeks after HMAS Adelaide was dumped in April 2011, Les Graham from Terrigal Dive identified it as the interior walling from the ship.
Hopefully the State Govt and the diving community will take some responsibility in the long term for cleaning up the debris released from the wreck - it is dangerous for marine life, swimmers and surfers. The community of Avoca should not have to be picking up the mess as the ship breaks down and washes up on the beach over the coming decades
Some of the money from the diving permits and dive fees should be put into a fund to clean up the mess. To deliberately dump the ship in such a high swell environment was totally irresponsible and the government and local organisations who supported it need to take responsibility for the clean up as time goes on and the wreck inevitably breaks down into the surrounding marine environment.
For more pictures and community’s response check out No Ship on facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/pages/No-Ship/158050544229141?ref=hl

Debris from the dumped warship HMAS Adelaide collected on Avoca Beach after the big swell over the weekend (Feb 23 & 24, 2013). This marine pollution was sanctioned by the Minister for Environment Tony Bourke, Barry O’Farrell, Chris Hartcher, Gosford Council and John Asquith from the Community Environment Network, University of Newcastle and the Marine Discovery Centre. Taxpayers paid $10 million to dump this rubbish next to this beautiful beach.

Much more is washing up, this is just what one person collected on their morning walk on Saturday. When the same honeycomb aluminium started washing up on Avoca Beach six weeks after HMAS Adelaide was dumped in April 2011, Les Graham from Terrigal Dive identified it as the interior walling from the ship.

Hopefully the State Govt and the diving community will take some responsibility in the long term for cleaning up the debris released from the wreck - it is dangerous for marine life, swimmers and surfers. The community of Avoca should not have to be picking up the mess as the ship breaks down and washes up on the beach over the coming decades

Some of the money from the diving permits and dive fees should be put into a fund to clean up the mess. To deliberately dump the ship in such a high swell environment was totally irresponsible and the government and local organisations who supported it need to take responsibility for the clean up as time goes on and the wreck inevitably breaks down into the surrounding marine environment.

For more pictures and community’s response check out No Ship on facebook
http://www.facebook.com/pages/No-Ship/158050544229141?ref=hl

The Australian Government has decided to RECYCLE the 2 obsolete warships HMAS Manoora and HMAS Kanimbla - finally Australia acts to dispose of their obsolete warships in a responsible manner. This is HMAS Kanimbla, an 11 000 tonne warship which the government were trying to dump in beautiful Jervis Bay, then the Gold Coast but it will now be recycled along with the 8 500 tonne HMAS Manoora.While it is too late for Avoca Beach this campaign successfully helped raise awareness of the toxic items (lead/PCBs/plastics) being dumped in our precious oceans, the waste of thousands of taxpayer dollars and tonnes of precious resources such as steel and aluminium, significant liability issues for public authorities responsible for the sea dumping and the hidden costs to the local marine environment where these ships are dumped. Our oceans are not a dump for military waste!
http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/dive-wreck-hopes-sunk-as-ships-head-to-scrapyard/story-e6freuy9-1226546770740http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/national/navy-workhorses-hmas-manoora-and-hmas-kanimbla-to-end-careers-as-scrap/story-fncynkc6-1226546722433

The Australian Government has decided to RECYCLE the 2 obsolete warships HMAS Manoora and HMAS Kanimbla - finally Australia acts to dispose of their obsolete warships in a responsible manner.

This is HMAS Kanimbla, an 11 000 tonne warship which the government were trying to dump in beautiful Jervis Bay, then the Gold Coast but it will now be recycled along with the 8 500 tonne HMAS Manoora.


While it is too late for Avoca Beach this campaign successfully helped raise awareness of the toxic items (lead/PCBs/plastics) being dumped in our precious oceans, the waste of thousands of taxpayer dollars and tonnes of precious resources such as steel and aluminium, significant liability issues for public authorities responsible for the sea dumping and the hidden costs to the local marine environment where these ships are dumped.
Our oceans are not a dump for military waste!

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/dive-wreck-hopes-sunk-as-ships-head-to-scrapyard/story-e6freuy9-1226546770740

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/national/navy-workhorses-hmas-manoora-and-hmas-kanimbla-to-end-careers-as-scrap/story-fncynkc6-1226546722433

Navy workhorses HMAS Manoora and HMAS Kanimbla to end careers as scrap

Ian McPhedran, The Herald Sun
January 3, 2013
"The government has decided that a minimal return to taxpayers for scrap is a better outcome than spending $4 million to make each ship safe for use as a dive wreck. The 8000-tonne hulks have a scrap metal value of about $2.5 million each."
Read article

Dive wreck hopes sunk as ships sent to scrapyard

Defence WebAugust 11, 2011Click here to read full article

The Australian Ministry of Defence has released a request for proposal for the disposal of 12 000 surplus Army vehicles and trailers as part of the nation’s biggest military disposal drive since the Second World War.
..over the next ten years the Defence Force will dispose of up to 24 ships; up to 70 combat aircraft; up to 110 other aircraft; up to 120 helicopters; up to 600 armoured vehicles; up to 12 000 other vehicles; and a variety of communications systems, weapons and explosive ordnance.
..the first opportunity for the Australian defence industry was the release of a Request for Proposal for the disposal of up to 24 Navy ships across the coming decade, including the HMAS Manoora amphibious ship (decommissioned this year), Adelaide Class frigates and Mine Hunters.Request for Proposals for the HMAS Manoora will close on September 15 this year while submissions for all other ships will close on October 14.

Clearly our government has a massive disposal dilemma on their hands. The HMAS Adelaide scuttling cost Australian taxpayers in excess of $10 million. The comparatively small tourism revenue being generated from the wreck is concentrated in a handful of dive businesses and exposed the government to serious public liability risk. 
In July 2010 David Coyle, who oversaw the scuttling preparation work for exHMAS Adelaide, confirmed that the vessel still contained approx 200 tonnes of aluminium and 2840 tonnes of steel. Simms Metals estimated the scrap value at that time was $771 200. Click here to read this report.
Since then demand for these precious resources has surged and developed countries such as the U.S., Belgium, U.K. and Canada are capitalising on the opportunity to salvage the valuable scrap by establishing sophisticated ship breaking yards.
Will the Australian government recognise this chance to establish a lucrative recycling industry creating jobs and eliminating waste? Or will they continue with the same archaic disposal methods that were used after WW1 when obsolete military equipment was just dumped in our beautiful ocean?

Defence Web
August 11, 2011
Click here to read full article

The Australian Ministry of Defence has released a request for proposal for the disposal of 12 000 surplus Army vehicles and trailers as part of the nation’s biggest military disposal drive since the Second World War.

..over the next ten years the Defence Force will dispose of up to 24 ships; up to 70 combat aircraft; up to 110 other aircraft; up to 120 helicopters; up to 600 armoured vehicles; up to 12 000 other vehicles; and a variety of communications systems, weapons and explosive ordnance.

..the first opportunity for the Australian defence industry was the release of a Request for Proposal for the disposal of up to 24 Navy ships across the coming decade, including the HMAS Manoora amphibious ship (decommissioned this year), Adelaide Class frigates and Mine Hunters.

Request for Proposals for the HMAS Manoora will close on September 15 this year while submissions for all other ships will close on October 14.

Clearly our government has a massive disposal dilemma on their hands. The HMAS Adelaide scuttling cost Australian taxpayers in excess of $10 million. The comparatively small tourism revenue being generated from the wreck is concentrated in a handful of dive businesses and exposed the government to serious public liability risk. 

In July 2010 David Coyle, who oversaw the scuttling preparation work for exHMAS Adelaide, confirmed that the vessel still contained approx 200 tonnes of aluminium and 2840 tonnes of steel. Simms Metals estimated the scrap value at that time was $771 200. Click here to read this report.

Since then demand for these precious resources has surged and developed countries such as the U.S., Belgium, U.K. and Canada are capitalising on the opportunity to salvage the valuable scrap by establishing sophisticated ship breaking yards.

Will the Australian government recognise this chance to establish a lucrative recycling industry creating jobs and eliminating waste? Or will they continue with the same archaic disposal methods that were used after WW1 when obsolete military equipment was just dumped in our beautiful ocean?

HMAS Adelaide 3 Month Environment Report Card - “F”

April 13 through July 13 2011 is the first 3 months of the ex-HMAS Adelaide Dump & Dive site.

Click here to view what has happened so far.

Courtesy Adrian Brightmoore
What Happened at Avoca Beach? website

Underwater dangerNewcastle HeraldJuly 27, 2001
(click image to view article)

Underwater danger
Newcastle Herald
July 27, 2001

(click image to view article)

Court Documents

Envirolab carried out testing for toxic polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on samples of different materials still present on board the ex HMAS Adelaide on March 27 2010. 61 samples were collected and  48 samples tested positive to containing greater than 1mg/kg of PCBs, however 28 samples returned a result of 10 mg/kg or higher. Download the Envirolab reports here. 

Evidence From Werner Hoyt - 15 April 2010 [PDF]

Evidence from Steve Paulsen - 13 April 2010 [PDF]

Evidence from Jim Puckett - 26 June 2010 [PDF]

Lead Paint Test Results - 13 July 2010 [PDF]

PCB Test Results - Envirolab [PDF]

PCB Test Results - NMI [PDF]

Recycling Quote - 3 July 2010

Decision and Reasons for Decision - 15 September 2010

Decision and Reasons for Decision - 15 October 2010 

Warship going cheap - the inspection
What happens when two dive shop proprietors stumble upon a deal too good to be true?  
These photos, except the toilet, are from FOI requests on the final inspections of the ex-HMAS Adelaide before she was dumped in the bay at Avoca Beach. The toilet is a photo from within the dumped vessel at Avoca Beach by a diver in early 2011. What were these blokes thinking?  
Courtesy Adrian Brightmoore What Happened at Avoca?

Warship going cheap - the inspection

What happens when two dive shop proprietors stumble upon a deal too good to be true?  

These photos, except the toilet, are from FOI requests on the final inspections of the ex-HMAS Adelaide before she was dumped in the bay at Avoca Beach. The toilet is a photo from within the dumped vessel at Avoca Beach by a diver in early 2011. What were these blokes thinking?  

Courtesy Adrian Brightmoore What Happened at Avoca?

Ocean Grove VoiceJuly 13, 2011
Wreck dive site closedFour months after Parks Victoria warned divers about visiting the ex-HMAS Canberra dive site, the scuttled ship is now closed.
Oz Dive Boat Charters owner Tom Wende visits other wrecks off the Victoria coast that date back to 100 years old and Tom said he was disappointed that the Canberra had come apart so soon after it was scuttled.
"It’s a pity that it hasn’t lasted more than two years" he said
Click here to read full article or visit http://www.oceangrovevoice.com/2011/07/ship-temporarily-shut/
Pictured above is the ex-HMAS Canberra frigate which was scuttled on October 4 2009 off the Geelong coast and is the identical sister ship of ex-HMAS Adelaide. 
Our government spent $10 million of our taxpayer dollars to sink the wrong ship in the wrong place for a comparatively small financial gain and timeframe.

Ocean Grove Voice
July 13, 2011

Wreck dive site closed
Four months after Parks Victoria warned divers about visiting the ex-HMAS Canberra dive site, the scuttled ship is now closed.

Oz Dive Boat Charters owner Tom Wende visits other wrecks off the Victoria coast that date back to 100 years old and Tom said he was disappointed that the Canberra had come apart so soon after it was scuttled.

"It’s a pity that it hasn’t lasted more than two years" he said

Click here to read full article or visit http://www.oceangrovevoice.com/2011/07/ship-temporarily-shut/

Pictured above is the ex-HMAS Canberra frigate which was scuttled on October 4 2009 off the Geelong coast and is the identical sister ship of ex-HMAS Adelaide. 

Our government spent $10 million of our taxpayer dollars to sink the wrong ship in the wrong place for a comparatively small financial gain and timeframe.

Safety fears shut wreck

Geelong Advertiser
July 6, 2011